Thursday June 13 to Thursday June 20

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Thursday June 13 to Thursday June 20


The First Quarter Moon is Friday, June 14. Comet 12P Pons-Brooks is no longer visible in binoculars. Saturn enters the evening sky around midnight, but is still best in the morning. In a telescope Saturn’s famous rings are almost edge on. In the morning the lineup of planets is Saturn, Mars and Jupiter. with Jupiter low on the horizon.

The First Quarter Moon is Friday, June 14. The moon is at apogee, when it is furthest from the Earth, at this time.

Eastern evening
sky on Saturday, June 15 as seen from Adelaide at 18:41 ACST (90 minutes
after sunset, click to embiggen).   

The constellation of Scorpius is now clearly visible above the eastern horizon. If your skies are dark enough, you can see the indigenous dark constellation of the Emu.

Similar views will be seen from the rest of Australia at the equivalent local time (90 minutes after sunset).

Morning
sky on Saturday, June 15  as seen from Adelaide at 06:22 ACST, (60 minutes
before sunrise, click to embiggen). Saturn and Mars are readily visible. Jupiter is below the pair and is now more visible but still low on the horizon.

 

The inset
is the telescopic view of Saturn at this time.

 

 

Similar views will be seen from the rest of Australia at the equivalent local time (60 minutes before sunrise). 

 

Whole sky on Saturday, June 15 as seen from Adelaide at 18:41 ACST, 90 minutes after sunset (click
to embiggen). Bright Sirius is still dominant low in the north-western sky in the early evening. Scorpius now well visible above the Eastern horizon. Between the bright star
Canopus and the Southern Cross are a wealth of binocular objects to
discover. The fainter clusters will be begin to be lost as the moon waxes.

 

 

   

 Elsewhere
in Australia will see a similar view at the equivalent time (90 minutes after sunset).

 

 

Mercury is lost in the twilight

Venus is lost in thetwilight.

Mars is rising in the morning sky.

Jupiter is low the the morning twilight sky.

Saturn climbs higher in the morning sky.

Labels: weekly sky

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